djupaskogar:

by Mattias Klum
djupaskogar:

by Mattias Klum
sowhatsstoppingyou:

Massimo Vitali

sowhatsstoppingyou:

Massimo Vitali

dimestorekeets:

It’s a small world.

casadabiqueira:

Les Menuires Grande, France

Massimo Vitali, 2000

casadabiqueira:

Les Menuires Grande, France

Massimo Vitali, 2000

casadabiqueira:

Picnic Allée, Paris, France

Massimo Vitali, 2000

casadabiqueira:

Picnic Allée, Paris, France

Massimo Vitali, 2000

daspersona:

©Massimo Vitali

daspersona:

©Massimo Vitali

iskiii:

happypool

iskiii:

happypool

ridingwithstrangers:

Massimo Vitali Piscinao de Ramos, Brazil, 2012

ridingwithstrangers:

Massimo Vitali 
Piscinao de Ramos, Brazil, 2012

redgreenamber:

Marlon Brando, by Mary Ellen Mark

redgreenamber:

Marlon Brando, by Mary Ellen Mark

redgreenamber:

by Mary Ellen Mark

redgreenamber:

by Mary Ellen Mark

jumblepusher:

Mary Ellen Mark. “Feet Strapped Down in Bed, Ward 81, Oregon State Hospital”. 1976. Salem, OR, USA.

jumblepusher:

Mary Ellen Mark. “Feet Strapped Down in Bed, Ward 81, Oregon State Hospital”. 1976. Salem, OR, USA.

maciekjasik:

Mumbai from BRICS project © Marcus Lyon

maciekjasik:

Mumbai from BRICS project © Marcus Lyon

thecameralover:

Lynsey Addario is a photography superhero.

thecameralover:

Lynsey Addario is a photography superhero.

990000:

foreignpolicy.com:

Africa’s Forever Wars – Why the continent’s conflicts never end. 
by Jeffrey Gettleman
There is a very simple reason why some of Africa’s bloodiest, most brutal wars never seem to end: They are not really wars. Not in the traditional sense, at least. The combatants don’t have much of an ideology; they don’t have clear goals. They couldn’t care less about taking over capitals or major cities — in fact, they prefer the deep bush, where it is far easier to commit crimes. Today’s rebels seem especially uninterested in winning converts, content instead to steal other people’s children, stick Kalashnikovs or axes in their hands, and make them do the killing. Look closely at some of the continent’s most intractable conflicts, from the rebel-laden creeks of the Niger Delta to the inferno in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and this is what you will find.
What we are seeing is the decline of the classic African liberation movement and the proliferation of something else — something wilder, messier, more violent, and harder to wrap our heads around. If you’d like to call this war, fine. But what is spreading across Africa like a viral pandemic is actually just opportunistic, heavily armed banditry. My job as the New York Times’ East Africa bureau chief is to cover news and feature stories in 12 countries. But most of my time is spent immersed in these un-wars.
more…
photo: Lynsey Addario/VII

via dcy3

990000:

foreignpolicy.com:

Africa’s Forever WarsWhy the continent’s conflicts never end.

by Jeffrey Gettleman

There is a very simple reason why some of Africa’s bloodiest, most brutal wars never seem to end: They are not really wars. Not in the traditional sense, at least. The combatants don’t have much of an ideology; they don’t have clear goals. They couldn’t care less about taking over capitals or major cities — in fact, they prefer the deep bush, where it is far easier to commit crimes. Today’s rebels seem especially uninterested in winning converts, content instead to steal other people’s children, stick Kalashnikovs or axes in their hands, and make them do the killing. Look closely at some of the continent’s most intractable conflicts, from the rebel-laden creeks of the Niger Delta to the inferno in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and this is what you will find.

What we are seeing is the decline of the classic African liberation movement and the proliferation of something else — something wilder, messier, more violent, and harder to wrap our heads around. If you’d like to call this war, fine. But what is spreading across Africa like a viral pandemic is actually just opportunistic, heavily armed banditry. My job as the New York Times’ East Africa bureau chief is to cover news and feature stories in 12 countries. But most of my time is spent immersed in these un-wars.

more…

photo: Lynsey Addario/VII

via dcy3